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Schoolhouse Spaces: Tallulah's in Seattle

Category: All Category: Spaces

Welcoming, cool and vintage-vibed, our latest Schoolhouse Space is an enticing neighborhood spot in the ever-buzzy Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. Opened in 2013 by The Derschang Group, a collective known for creating uniquely delectable city institutions, Tallulah’s continues to thrive and attract the hungry and thirsty en masse. 

With a veggie-forward menu and drinks worth doubling down on, Tallulah’s serves up plenty of reasons to indulge. Paired with their mid-century modern interior, gorgeous Schoolhouse lighting, and healthy dose of 70’s style kitch, there’s no shortage of classic photo ops to capture while you dine. We had a chat with Derschang founder, mega creative and community activist Linda Derschang about this vibrant, one-of-a-kind spot.

Name: Tallulah’s
Date opened: 
December 2013
Neighborhood:
Capitol Hill

Tell us about Tallulah’s  – What was the inspiration behind the restaurant? 

"Tallulah’s was created to be a favorite neighborhood café, the sort of place you might have dinner a couple times a week, plus brunch on the weekend. I lived in the neighborhood for many years and had friends that were craving another place to hang out and have a drink, dinner, bring kids, meet friends."

Where does the name come from? 

"The name is a long-time favorite."

Was there a specific design vision from the beginning or did it come together organically? How did you work to create the unique look and feel of the space?

"Tallulah's was inspired by a love of mid-century design, the feeling of Big Sur in the 1970's, and a touch of Morocco. The intent was to create something fresh yet timeless."

What are some of your favorite elements about the overall design or branding of Tallulah’s? 

"Being able to work with local artists is definitely at the top of our list. We have several pieces by Jen Ament and Derek Erdman throughout the restaurant that I really love."

What drew you to the Schoolhouse Isaac Pendant and Luna light fixtures you chose for the space in particular? 

"The classic mid-century style that Schoolhouse does so well made the fixtures a natural fit. They really stand out and work in the space beautifully."

Can you tell us your philosophy behind food and how that plays out in the menu and presentation? 

"Tallulah’s has a vegetable-driven menu that offers globally inspired, seasonal food. More and more, we see people moving away from eating a lot of meat and toward plant forward diets, but not necessarily becoming a vegetarian or vegan. I wanted Tallulah’s to be part of that."

What sets Tallulah’s apart for the typical Seattle dining scene or just in general? 

"The open-air cafe style with midcentury accents, plus the plant-filled patio, makes the space very unique, as does the vegetable forward menu."  

What’s your #1 recommended food and drink order? 

"I love the Grilled Albacore Tuna Bowl coupled with our Frozen Rosé Paloma or a glass of Sancerre. I like to start with blistered Shishito Peppers with sea salt and honey and an order of Gourgeres." 

What do you like best about Seattle and your neighborhood in particular? 

"I love the people in our neighborhood, the shops and restaurants, and really I love finding ways to collaborate with our neighbors. We’ve got several wooden stools and candlesticks from Tirto Furniture, which is just across the street. Two doors down from Tallulah’s is Hello Robin Cookies. Robin collaborated with us on our most recent dessert menu and created a Brownie Ice Cream Sandwich for us."

Finally, where did that magical cat painting come from? And does he/she have a name?

"Her name is Cashmere and she was found in a vintage store in Georgetown. Later we found out that Cashmere was actually a print sold at JC Penny in the late 70’s, early 80’s – Cashmere actually has some brothers and sisters out there!"

Thanks so much for sharing your space with us Linda!

| Visit TALLULAH'S |
4PM Every Day
550 19th Avenue E
Seattle, WA 98112

Photography by Ellie Lillstrom 

 



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